De Bess Ah Trini Speak, right Gee?

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The food vocabulary is easy to learn (bodi is long green beans) as that’s a matter of memorization, and many of the words have an origin that is typical of Trinidad’s cultural influences. Bodi probably originates from the Hindi word and was likely introduced by the South Asians.

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Linguists could have a field day.

Ya dam right gee. For de bess ah tongue.

Or something like that. I have no idea! Habla espanol?

Cinderella Coconuts

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J’ouvert in July – Carnival in Trinidad – Lime and Wine

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JQ-_ZuMNLMazgo84FXS73vqNSmIMwI33azWSrSRkP8douy03-IF3cswLx4laT-8tCsFzO1rhDi_zqiQogwT1npIH2qKeccr6OZI1JyQvbCPtbA2_5W9xtjg0UtiJI0TAncDfi2fBGr6ycMu6bfeM-l9BNJTmxNwVesVMbJoRvzHAJ8oXkmKPs_eO2uWhat amazed me was the creative ways that people (mostly women) had altered their t-shirts into outfits with various forms of holes and tailoring.

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Best Sushi in Santo Domingo

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-7nSXy9n4-1OaRa9WOfxHigPGcNOmTFlQucYJFWjiHX9APK8NkT3aqDrPOR4jfcoRI888paTHCZroTmhtXxSP1Vj2AaAVfIC37xLbMo9Dfh8S9RZXZMKkdlMXP_44uCl6yB63hS1C_bPaLTw3tamykrZN6k1j2X4OclN-i7XDp2m37GdT-UTApOV_LThe sushi place has excellent sashimi (raw fish like the salmon in the first photo — a double portion), tiridito dishes (Peruvian “carpaccio” of fish — thin slices with sauce. See the photo of the fish in the yellow sauce, above.), and ceviches (classic Peruvian style in photo above, with deep fried sweet potato deep and Peruvian corn). Many of the other dishes are good as well, as are their cocktails. I liked their “tuna tartare” which was like a large portion of Hawaiian “poke” (raw fish salad mixed with soy sauce, green onions, sesame seed oil, and chili or mayonnaise… you get the idea) with extra ingredients.

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As for this place being the best sushi place in the DR, I didn’t eat at too many sushi places but this place was so good that I looked forward to eating there. Who needs to go anywhere else? It’s not this local fish place…

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Playa Bonita at Las Terrenas

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I can’t tell you the location because it simply appeared, like magic.