Delivery in the Time of COVID – Lima Edition

As Peru enters it’s third (or is it fourth?) week of quarantine, buying groceries has become a challenge. To make it a little bit easier, I’ve compiled a google doc of places that deliver. I’ve sourced my information from my friends, colleagues, food industry contacts, an el trinche, and a C&W – Directorio Delivery 2020-V01.pdf.pdf.pdf.pdf document sent to me. I hope the readers of my blog who live in Lima (are there three of you?) will find this google doc of use.

I have only received delivery from a few of the places as my kitchen is fairly well-stocked and the local bodega, corner store, has most of the basics. I can’t recall the last time I ate so many mandarins or potatoes…

Speaking of potatoes, the microwave is an excellent way to cook a potato.

Once Upon A Danish Yule

A Danish Christmas (or yule) is celebrated on December 24 in the evening (like the Peruvians). While there are many different family traditions, the evening will be something like as this…

It will be dark as the sun may have set around four in the afternoon. There may be a light layer of slush or sleet on the trees, glinting in the streetlamps. If you are lucky, there will be snow providing a soft sparkle to the night. As you make your way to the family celebration, you will walk the decorated streets, festooned with garlands of lights, candles flickering on window sills, and the smell of onions frying.

When you get to your destination, all dressed in red or green, you will be hugged and kissed by your hosts. Warmth will greet you as you enter the home. The windows and doors may be decorated with paper cut outs of Christmas elves, some of these may be less Disney and more Dickens in style and may, every year, be carefully preserved in tissue paper, to once again every year, get taped to the walls to tell their stories of tricks or goose chasing. The elves can be in sets of activities, some doing winter sports, or playing in a band, or cooking. Some are hand-made and others are bought every year and carefully cut out. The tree will be decorated with heirloom decorations (perhaps a small decorated bottle cap star that grandma made when she was but a wee thing) and tinsel. Some people even keep up the old tradition of live candles on the tree. img_1693

(The Danes, most of whom are Lutheran, may go to a Christmas church service. This, for some, is the only time of the year that they will go to church. Otherwise, the churches are used mostly for baptisms, confirmations, weddings, and funerals.) Christmas music will be playing everywhere and even the non-religious will still get into the Christmas spirit.

Perhaps you will be offered mulled wine, adding a smell of warm wine, spices, and raisins to the air. The dinner will include roast duck or pork roast with crackling (goose in old times, and in modern times, turkey). The meal includes small caramelized potatoes, chestnut colored and slightly sweet. There will be brown gravy, boiled potatoes, warm red cabbage, stuffing made of cooked apples and prunes, and there will be lots of everything. For Christmas dessert, the Danes eat rice pudding. It’s a rice, cream, and chopped almond dessert served with cooked cherry sauce (or strawberry — something to evoke the red and white colors of Denmark). The special thing about dessert is that the rice pudding is actually a game — one of the almonds is left intact and whoever finds it without chewing it, wins the “almond gift.” Many grandparents make special bowls for the grandchildren (usually for those under 15) who will then miraculously find an almond in their portion! In the old days, the prize would be a pig made out of marzipan, and indeed, it is still possible to buy or make your own marzipan pig to enjoy at Christmastime.

Another fun thing about the Danes is that they have a “practice” Christmas dinner on November 10, which is Saint Martin’s Eve, when one would eat a roast goose and thus practice making a Christmas meal. Really, it’s often just another reason to get together with friends and family and enjoy some “hygge” or coziness. In the time up to Christmas there will be many parties, including the Christmas lunch but I’ll blog about that later. Sometimes one is invited, or hosts, a Christmas decoration/craft party during which Christmas tree decorations are made, paper elves are cut, table centerpiece tableaux are made, and sometimes candles, cookies, and candy are cooked. Often mulled wine is served at these parties as well.)

After dinner which will include a few toasts (the Danes have a special ritualistic way that they toast including always make eye contact with everyone around the table when they toast. The clinking of glasses is less important). After dinner, there will be a break. Sometimes the break is to walk the dogs, air the room, or do some clearing up of the dishes. Then there will be coffee and brandy served, and people will move into position around the living room. But, first, there is singing and dancing!

Everyone holds hands and dances around the Christmas tree singing Christmas carols. Often it’s just the first two verses and in many families, the carols are chosen by the youngest person and all the way up to the oldest (everyone knows that grandpa likes a certain song, so out of deference, one does not pick that song!). Dogs are included so sometimes you will be holding a wagging tail… or the bark. Generally, the direction one dances around the Christmas tree changes with every song, and at the end, there is one particular song, “Now it’s Christmas Again” which is sung with such gusto that someone will peel away from the tree and lead everyone in a conga line around the house until ending up back at the sofas, where the coffee, brandy, and cigarettes (in the old days), are waiting.

Then it’s gift time! But, there is no mad ransacking of the gifts in a Danish Christmas. Usually, someone (with able knees — so that they can crawl under the tree) will put on an elf hat and be the designated Santa Claus helper. The person will find a gift for the youngest person, read the gift label (“To Uncle Jens, Merry Christmas, you are wished a wonderful new year, with dearest love, your nephew Michael” or some such thing), and hand the gift to the person. Everyone will watch, cameras poised, for the look of delight when the gift is opened, someone will have the trash bag at the ready, another will have scissors or a pocket knife in hand ready to assist with a troublesome ribbon or dastardly piece of tape. Then, the person will look ever so pleased and say, “we agree to do the thank yous after all the gifts are opened?” And so on. This will go on until everyone is sitting with a neat pile of gifts, perhaps with wrapping bows stuck to their sweaters or hair, and looking happy. As the gifts thin out under the tree, the santa helper will make sure to hold back one gift for each person for the final round. After all the gifts are unwrapped, everyone gets up to say thank you and hug.

The next day, and certainly within a week, thank you cards will have been sent out. (Another thing about Danes: after a gathering, the next time you see someone, it’s important to say, “tak for sidst” or “thank you for the last time.”) Everyone goes to bed waiting to see what’s in their stocking in the morning.

Idealistic, right? That’s how it should be. Tis the season.

Merry Christmas! God Jul (pronounced “go yule”)!

10 Best Burgers in Lima

*******Update October 19, 2019****** Since Peruvians love hamburgers, it’s hard to pick the best, since there are so many burgers to try… But, for the fun of it, I will. At most places, the meat patty is about 250 grams. Peruvians like a meaty burger. Not thin patties.

1. Don Doh: Given that one of the co-owners is the butcher who runs Osso, I’d expect the burger to be good. The black bun is slightly chewy and moist due to the squid ink that makes it black. Inside the burger is a good 200 grams and made with chopped kimchi.

eOuAOrXFdlc-4jKO1bsCulBcoIO8r1bTGDSBk5tZXMQa3qWuC_wy1xnBE3Nl69pvYZ_IM4Y244665Tm-dCl1cZz5oa0gqoSCrn575220GTIsm_viYgKD4PB1Lcu9WrW4cBMJcqIe-0oMR65EG6izFCPSLlct9MGiS-zCpbTYZAoRqdrurCFXDS2T0szn-hBztf1DS3taNW6D2d1LVvhW-AlJOlGJcvk2. Osso: It’s a steak house so they should have a good burger. The burger is actually a chopped steak burger. It’s meaty. But, the fries are what makes me keep coming back.

3. Sushi Pop: Thin and made from Angus beef. The patties are more like Five Guys in the U.S. As you can see below, it’s hard to find the patties under the cheese, sauce, and fried onion… but the meat was good even if it was hard to find. Next time I’ll get it without the sauce. Sushi Pop serves the burger on a “bao” or steamed bun.

7in9K6JkiL6u3bt7r7cJQouG4EaFCGFXpfrEn79uYpEMUV8FoRPJeFPBpX42AcLxR7td1EhD0IX7sAwcMfd5pA1SfPdWqoyWQixj2134BrL-Pla3oDtXfMpXWAEOx7Jr-1Z41bKlSX2v_JOZSEQXvuS1O-isabMwP_z971mE5D8xdCYFANAp58cSCsy__WHSMcPZ6u-mn2sNYHAGAvE7wVCexLU2Kso4. Cosme: The burger is good.It’s just another secret thing about Cosme.

5. Papachos: They no longer have a Wagyu or Kobe. The “luxury” Angus burger is a solid burger.  I’m told that many think that the burgers are too salty. I didn’t think so.

6. Juicy Lucy: This burger isn’t that large but it’s a solid tasting burger. The fries are local round potatoes. (This chain is from the same owner of Carnal so at Carnal you can get the sinfully delicious version of the juicy lucy.)

7. Bon Beef: The burger is a burger much like at Fridays or Chilis. Bon Beef is that sort of place.

8. Django Burgers, Hipolito unanue 101, Miraflores (10th block of Ejercito): good burger. so so fries.

Okay, eight. Then there are these other places that have been recommended to me or that I have been to:

Cafe A Bistro: This gas station bistro was recommended to me for their burger. I thought it was okay until I hit a piece of cartilage (set the grind on a finer size!). Then I stopped.

El Jefe: It’s a burger but I didn’t find the meat tasty and it had that mealy cardboard texture that makes me think of certain fast food chains…

Food Rockers (not Fuddruckers): Located a bit off the beaten track in San Borja, this place has a burger but it’s the black ice cream that’s worth the visit. More about that in another blog posting.

Quisso: First raclette based restaurant in Lima. They melt cheese on everything including an artisanal burger freshly ground for the restaurant.

I have not been to this place but, Hamburguesas Artesanales, Av. Gral. Eugenio Garzón 977, Jesús María, won the 2018 Burger Fest.

Restaurants Open for Monday Dinner

IMG_7248***Updated January 20, 2019**** If you went out for dinner on Sunday night, then maybe you also want to out for dinner on Monday night. Here is a partial list of restaurants to go to for dinner on a Monday night in Lima. The restaurants are listed by how early you can eat dinner (4 pm early bird?).

MIRAFLORES/SAN ISIDRO/LINCE/MAGDALENA

Siete Sopas, Av. Arequipa 2394, Lince (Open 24 hours; seven days a week): This is a soup restaurant from the chain La Lucha Sangucheria. They have three soups each day. They always have “criolla” and “diet” (chicken soup) and then the day’s soup. It’s advertised on the wall outside so you can see the soup of the day from outside (or just have it memorized like some of my friends… “today’s Tuesday, so not MY soup day.”).

Social Restaurant & Bar in the Hilton Hotel, Av. la Paz 1099, Miraflores (Mon: 6:30AM–1AM)

Franklin, Av. Alvarez Calderón 198, San Isidro (6:30 a.m. — midnight, 365 days a year): American food. Named after Franklin D. Roosevelt.

La Vista Restaurant in the JW Marriott Hotel, Malecón de la Reserva 615, Miraflores (Mon: 6AM–11PM)

Bodega de la Trattoria, Armendariz 299, Miraflores (Mon: 7AM-10PM)

La Tiendecita Blanca (Swiss Peruvian), Av Jose Larco 111, Miraflores (Mon: 7AM–12AM)

Mangos Restaurante in Larcomar Mall, Malecón de la Reserva 610 (Mon: 8AM–1AM)

La Lucha Sanguchería Criolla in Larcomar Mall (casual sándwich shop) and at various locations including Av. Sta. Cruz 847, Miraflores (Óvalo Gutiérrez – the circle with the Wong and the movie theater) and Diagonal 139, Miraflores (Mon: 8AM–12AM)

Sarcletti – Benavides Miraflores, Av. Benavides 474 int.108/109, Miraflores (Mon: 8AM—10PM)

Zimmerman, Av Vasco Núñez de Balboa 326, Miraflores (Mon: 8:30AM–10PM)

Tanta in Larcomar Mall, Circuito de Playas 3773, Miraflores (Mon: 9AM–12AM)

La Bodega Antigua, San Fernando 401, Miraflores (Mon: 10:30AM–2AM)

La Vaca Loca in Larcomar Mall, C.C 18,, Malecón de la Reserva 610 (Mon: 11AM–12AM)

Restaurante Alfresco, Av 28 de Julio 331 (Mon: 12PM–11PM)

Delfino Mar, Jorge Chávez 509, Miraflores (Mon: 12PM-10PM)

Bodega de la Trattoria, Calle General Borgoño 748, Miraflores (Mon: 12PM—12AM)

Bodega de la Trattoria, Armendariz 299, Miraflores (Mon: 12PM—12AM)

Papacho’s Miraflores (burgers), in Larcomar Mall and here: Av. la Paz 1045, Miraflores (Mon: 12:00PM–2AM)

La Rosa Náutica, Espigón Miraflores, Lima 18, Circuito de Playas (Mon: 12PM–12AM)

KO Asian Kitchen in Larcomar Mall, Local 207, Malecón de la Reserva 610 (Mon: 12PM–12AM)

ámaZ, Av. la Paz 1079, Miraflores (Mon: 12:30PM—11:30PM)

Dánica, Armendariz 546 (Mon: 12:30PM—11:30PM)

IK Restaurante, Calle Elías Aguirre 179, Miraflores (Mon: 6-11PM)

La Trattoria di Mambrino in Larcomar Mall (Mon: 6:20 PM–12AM)

Restaurant Huaca Pucllana, Cdra 8, Calle General Borgoño (Mon: 7PM–12AM)

Bao? (café with Asian sandwiches), 15074, José Domingo Choquehuanca 411 (Mon: 7PM–11PM)

Toshi Nikkei, Armendariz 480, Miraflores (Mon: 7PM—11PM)

Ache, Av. la Paz 1055, Miraflores (Mon: 7PM—11PM)

Los Bachiche, 1025, Av. la Paz, Miraflores (Mon: 7PM—11:30PM)

El Parrillón de Pablo Profumo, Av 28 de Julio 795, Miraflores (Mon: 7PM–12AM)

Tragaluz in the Belmond Hotel, Los Carolinos 118, Miraflores (Mon: 7:30PM—11PM)

Paprika Restaurante Lima in the Costa del Sol Hotel, Av. Gral. Salaverry 3060 (Mon: 6AM—11PM)

Sarcletti Dos De Mayo, Av. Dos de Mayo 1297, San Isidro, (Mon: 7AM—11PM)

Restaurante Vivaldi, Av. Camino Real 415, San Isidro (Mon: 8AM—11:59PM)

Bon Beef, Av. Pardo y Aliaga 596, San Isidro (Mon: 12PM—11PM)

Restaurant Cuarto y Mitad, Av. Los Conquistadores 1266, San Isidro (Mon: 12:30PM—11PM)

Antica, Av. Dos de Mayo 732, San Isidro (Mon: 12PM—12AM)

San Cerefino (Italian-Peruvian), Av Dos de Mayo 793, San Isidro (Mon:12PM—11:30PM)

Baco & Vaca, Av. Dos de Mayo 798, San Isidro (Mon: 12PM—12AM)

La Bodega de la Trattoria, Av. Dos de Mayo 715, San Isidro (Mon: 12PM—11:30PM)

SPizza, Av. Dos de Mayo 455, San Isidro (Mon: 12:30PM—10PM)

Makoto Sushi Bar & Restaurante, Av. Dos de Mayo 585, San Isidro (Mon:12:30PM—11PM)

La Locanda in the Swissotel Lima, Av. Santo Toribio 173 Vía Central 150, Centro Empresarial San Isidro (Mon: 7PM–11PM)

Gioconda Restaurante, Av. Dos de Mayo 570, San Isidro (Mon: 7PM—11PM)

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BARRANCO

Sofá Café Barranco, Avenida San Martin N°480, Interior 105, Barranco (Mon: 8AM–12AM)

Germinando Vida, Av. Almte. Miguel Grau 209A, Barranco (Mon: 10AM–10PM)

Antica Trattoria, 201, Av San Martin, Barranco (Mon: 12PM—12AM)

La Cabrera, Av. Almte. Miguel Grau 1502, Barranco (Mon: 12PM–12AM)

Viejo Fundo, Av. República de Panamá 201, Barranco (Mon: 12PM–11PM)

Rustica, Parque Municipal 105 – 107 Barranco (Mon: 12:30PM-12:30AM)

Cala, Circuito de Playas, Barranco (Mon: 12PM–12AM)

La 73, Av. el Sol 175, Barranco (Mon: 12PM–11:59PM)

La Posada Del Mirador, 104, Ermita, Barranco (Mon: 5PM—1AM)

Amoramar, García y García 175, Barranco (Mon: 8PM–11:30PM)

La Cuadra de Salvador, Jirón Centenario 105, Barranco (Mon: 8PM–11PM)

 

CENTRAL LIMA

Cafe Museo Larco, Av. Simón Bolivar 1509, Cercado de Lima (Mon: 9AM–10PM)

Tanta Restaurant, Pasaje Nicolás de Rivera 142, Cercado de Lima (Mon: 9AM—10PM)

 

SAN BORJA/SURCO/LA MOLINA

Sarcletti Encalada, Av La Encalada 1737, Surco (Mon: 7AM—11PM)

Sarcletti – La Molina, Av. Javier Prado Este 5790, Cercado de Lima (Mon: 7:30AM—11PM)

Sarcletti Chacarilla, Jirón Monterrey 239, Surco (Mon: 7:30AM—11PM)

La Bodega de la Trattoria, Av. Primavera 712, Surco (Mon: 9AM—11PM)

Antica Pizzeria, Av. Primavera 335, San Borja (Mon: 12PM—12AM)

Nanka, Jr. Los Bambúes 198 (a la espalda del CC Molina Plaza, La Molina (Mon: 12:30—11:30PM)

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When Tea is Lunch – Meal Times in Lima

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A breakfast sandwich of “pan chicharron” or pork roast and sweet potato.

Meal times are slightly different in Lima. For breakfast, Limenos eat a sandwich and cup of coffee for breakfast (desayuno), in the 7-9 times frame. Like the Colombians, they don’t eat sweets early in the morning so the idea of pancakes in the morning is an odd idea to them. Then, a cafecito (everything is ‘ito”in Lima) later in the morning (the Brits have “elevenses” at 11 a.m.) and in Lima coffee is always served with a mini-cookie.

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Ceviche – only for lunch!

Lunch (almuerzo) is from 1-2:30 p.m. (12 for those who work early shifts) and usually includes rice, protein, salad, and soup and/or a side dish — and don’t forget that potatoes are a vegetable.

Then, from 4-6 p.m., when the cold tea-time cold winds move in, there is “lonche” — a version of the word “lunch” — which involves something warm to drink like tea, coffee, chocolate, plus a sandwich. The sandwiches are usually the triangular shaped sandwiches like large British tea sandwiches. It’s the local version of high tea.

Dinner (cena) is from 8-10 p.m. which means that many restaurant do not even open until 7:30 p.m.

Note: Knowing the meal times can help you get in without a reservation.

 

 

Oh to Breakfast

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And palta avocado! (It’s delicious in soup too!). Photo from El Pan de la Chola in Lima.

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Breakfast at KM Marker 52

F2yl8Y-igUdNURLmAzWQCpeur1o8H6Zv798pGYDQkDxZGQPRy-fwnbw1cQ7A0uj3RuY_H9rQmsYDDRKS9kpWJJg8XpEGUyIJ7_rLmz4WFOrk4_VCxtuTpUhagoK7iOc7wTb5qN-m0-Ygf1tQZpGhaaxFj_K2Ny8b67j2OHTasnzfxXTrXkCEYTr1UCLocated on the Panamerican highway at kilometer marker 52 on the road south of Lima, this bakery is a great pit stop for breakfast. It’s called Tambo Rural (tambo is the indigenous word for kiosk) and there is no sign so you just have to pay attention and turn in at marker 52. They now have a real dirt driveway and expanded parking lot so it’s much easier to stop off the highway.

rP8ffFMWjFoeO9pHiACIZdI2I22UoepATGVvCzjeK1jnjiKTO6D5eud7lZp1Jemf9JhUZiNyBlOKncrgizEKdo_purEp-2EzpdgTud0Z_jZBpvelxPyZNharVRHQtyEq-9Iy0SWcrPclEo6sCZjc3cKNpVxObekZRGA6PHaIVypIZtViVExH2VzzjHThe coffee is amazingly creamy.

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This place is not super fancy but it is good and covers all the bases. It’s not a secret either but TripAdvisor reviews are only in Spanish.

I enjoyed the fresh warm rolls, some filled with ham (turkey ham) and cheese, and some with olives and oregano. Plus that locally sources coffee. Yum. Great way to start a day and a trip. Go! Enjoy!

Cheesecake Recipe from King Arthur

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Crust

  • 1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs OR zwieback crumbs
  • 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon (1/3 cup) melted butter
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Filling

  • 2 cups (2 large packages) cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Topping (optional)

  • 12 ounce bag frozen raspberries, a scant 3 cups
  • 1 to 3 tablespoons sugar, to taste
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons Pie Filling Enhancer; use 1 tablespoon for a looser sauce, 2 tablespoons for thicker
  • pinch of ground cinnamon, optional

Instructions

  1. Select a pie pan whose inside top dimension is at least 9″, and whose height is at least 1 1/4″. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  2. Make the crust by stirring together all of the crust ingredients, mixing until thoroughly combined.
  3. Press the crumbs into the bottom and up the sides of the pie pan, making a thicker layer on the bottom than on the sides.
  4. Make the filling by mixing together the room-temperature cream cheese and sugar until smooth. Mix in the eggs and vanilla, again mixing until smooth. To avoid beating too much air into the batter, use a mixer set at low-medium speed. To avoid lumps, make sure the cream cheese is softened, and/or at room temperature.
  5. Set the pie pan onto a baking sheet, if desired; this makes it easier to transport in and out of the oven, and also protects the bottom of the crust from any potential scorching. Pour the filling into the crust.
  6. Place the cheesecake in the oven. Bake it for 20 minutes, then add a crust shield; or shield the crust with strips of aluminum foil. Bake for an additional 10 minutes (for a total of about 30 minutes). An instant-read thermometer inserted into the crust 1″ from the edge should read between 165°F and 170°F; the filling won’t look entirely set in the center.
  7. Remove the cheesecake from the oven, and set it on a rack to cool while you make the topping. Once the cake is cool, refrigerate it, covered, until you’re ready to serve it.
  8. To make the topping, place the frozen raspberries in a bowl to thaw. You can hasten the process with a quick trip through the microwave, but don’t let the berries cook.
  9. Add 1 tablespoon Pie Filling Enhancer, and stir until well combined. Is the topping as thick as you like? If not, stir in another tablespoon Pie Filling Enhancer.
  10. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, to taste. Stir in a pinch of ground cinnamon, if desired.
  11. Spoon the topping over the cheesecake, and cut slices to serve. Alternatively, cut slices, and top each with a dollop of topping.

Trini Food – Trinidad and Tobago Foods

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Pepper (said, “pehpah”) sauce: made from pureed Scotch Bonnet chili peppers. In the lingo of the today, “they don’t play” in “scoville” here. This pepper sauce is flame-thrower hot. Tread lightly. When ordering pepper sauce, it’s “light, medium, and heavy.”

Doubles: this is the most famous of Trini foods. It’s eaten for breakfast and is comprised of two (hence the name) pieces of fried flatbread topped with cooked chickpeas (garbanzos) in curry, with sauces (see one in hand in photo above). Some of the sauces are pepper/chili sauce and some vendors have their own tamarind sauce to add a sweetness to the mix. At most doubles stands, there are two lines. One for eat-in and one for take-out. The take-out line takes longer as the doubles are wrapped in wax paper. The eat-in line is faster partly because some people will eat six to seven doubles at one time. Now, apparently, there are places serving “triples.” You pay after you have eaten.

Buss up shut: A dish of Indian origin with a large stretchy roti in two layers (inside is a think powdery layer inside) which is ripped up to resemble a ripped shirt. Hence the name.

Roti: is a flat stretchy bread. Eaten with curry (curry goat, curry chicken, etc.).

Callaloo soup: Also very popular. Callaloo is a vegetable. The soup is fairly thick and looks a bit like stewed collard greens.

Crab and dumpling (it is a large pasta piece, no filling). See below. In a curry sauce.

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Channa: is lentils.

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Fry Bake: is fried flat bread usually served as a breakfast sandwich with dried salt cod or smoked herring. Both taste slightly fishy so I’d recommend getting them with a good amount of pepper sauce.

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Chow: is fruit in a slightly spicy brine.

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Macaroni pie: like mac and cheese but cut in squares.

The drinks of Trinidad and Tobago are plentiful. They drink rum and more rum. I was told that the best rum here was Angostura. They also have a ‘punch’ which is made up of all kinds of other alcohol so strong enough to punch you down for a day or two. One person I talked to told me that he had something to drink that was so strong that it made him stop drinking! Again, the national pastime seems to be “to lime” which is to hang out somewhere to drink.

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I did not have cow heel soup which is also a famous Trini food. It’s a thick soup made with cow hoof.