National Foods of The Bahamas

bs grits tunaHere in Nassau, when I asked people to tell me about the national foods of The Bahamas, this is what they told me about:

Peas and rice: Rice with a pulse — from green peas, beans, lentils, etc. They even have “corn and rice” but the important thing is to get some peas and rice. I would hear people talking about it on the streets. It’s a vital part of the day.

bs macBaked macaroni: or “mac and cheese” which is addictively delicious. It’s pasta, cheese, and a touch of jalapenos, baked with cheese on top. It can be cut like cake. Yum oh.

bs menuCracked conch: is deep fried conch.

Johnny cakes: like corn bread but less corny.

bs souseSouse: a soup to use for dipping your johnny cakes. You can add the spicy sauce as well.

Grouper: fish — baked, boiled, steamed, and cracked (deep fried).

Fish stew (tuna) and grits: anything with grits (when it’s a ground meat sauce, then it’s called “Fire Engine” which is classic comfort food. Even for breakfast. See photo above.

bs breakfast menuLobster: warm water spiny lobster tails. Popular in every way.

Chicken in da bag: deep fried chicken.

Ribs: barbecued.

 

The food in the Bahamas reminded me of foods of the American South. Comforting and hearty.

And one drink was mentioned to me.

Sky juice/gully wash: rum, coconut, and condensed milk. Too sweet for me.

The Child Voice Birds

Here in Caracas, every morning, I hear the voices of children. Or so I thought. In actual fact, the cries are those of a parrot. These wild birds can make a cry that sounds exactly like children calling out in some make believe language. I keep forgetting that I’m in the tropics.

The photo is just here for entertainment value. It’s from Chacao market.

Venezuelan Food and Drink in Venezuela

corn-for-sale-veArepa, arepa, arepa! It got to the point where I craved an arepa every day when in Venezuela. When in Rome. Here are some of the typical Venezuelan foods that I tried.

Arepa: a cornmeal bread used to splice and fill. New versions involve the use of beets and spices. There is a sweet version with cumin. Arepas can be fried or grilled. I liked running it through the toaster a few times.

Tequennos ( double en equals enya): mozzarella cheese sticks served with honey. A bar food.

Empanada: a dumpling usually made of cornmeal filled with shredded fish, cheese, meat, etc. ingredients-ve

Cachapa: corn omelette filled with beans, cheese, meat, etc. cachapa-ve

Chupe: soup, usually chicken broth with potatoes.

Perico: scrambled eggs with tomato and onion. Just like in Colombia.

Parilla: means grill and the Venezuelans love things on the grill.
Soup for breakfast: like the Colombians, the Venezuelans have a soup for breakfast but here it is primarily used as a hangover cure.
Paisa queso: a salty fresh cheese with large holes.
Hallaca (tamale): served mostly around Christmas. Also, at Christmastime, one can get “ham bread” which is a roulade bread made with ham, olives, and cheese.
Casabe: flat cassava bread.
casabe-ve
Cassava (nachos): pronounces with the “vee” sound is a dish of nachos. Casabe with the “bee” sound is a flat bread.

Desechado “shredded”: they do love shredded meat on everything. It’s like meat is a vegetable topping, sort of the way cheese is on every salad in the U.S.

Fresas con crema: strawberries with cream. It’s a thing. Good too.

There are many other types of typical Venezuelan food. But, I mainly heard the mantra of arepas every time I asked about national foods.vino-verano-ve

As for drinks, the fresh juice is fantastic in Venezuela. As is the rum. The Santa Teresa and the Diplomatico brands were both good enough to drink neat, hold the coke (and as most of the Coke is made without sugar, that is practical). There is a form of sangria called “vino verano” or summer wine which is red wine mixed with a soft drink.