Poke – When Will It Join the Peruvian Food Scene?

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When Tea is Lunch – Meal Times in Lima

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A breakfast sandwich of “pan chicharron” or pork roast and sweet potato.

Meal times are slightly different in Lima. For breakfast, Limenos eat a sandwich and cup of coffee for breakfast (desayuno), in the 7-9 times frame. Like the Colombians, they don’t eat sweets early in the morning so the idea of pancakes in the morning is an odd idea to them. Then, a cafecito (everything is ‘ito”in Lima) later in the morning (the Brits have “elevenses” at 11 a.m.) and in Lima coffee is always served with a mini-cookie.

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Ceviche – only for lunch!

Lunch (almuerzo) is from 1-2:30 p.m. (12 for those who work early shifts) and usually includes rice, protein, salad, and soup and/or a side dish — and don’t forget that potatoes are a vegetable.

Then, from 4-6 p.m., when the cold tea-time cold winds move in, there is “lonche” — a version of the word “lunch” — which involves something warm to drink like tea, coffee, chocolate, plus a sandwich. The sandwiches are usually the triangular shaped sandwiches like large British tea sandwiches. It’s the local version of high tea.

Dinner (cena) is from 8-10 p.m. which means that many restaurant do not even open until 7:30 p.m.

Note: Knowing the meal times can help you get in without a reservation.

 

 

Farmers’ Markets in Lima

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Saturdays, 9-2 (maybe slightly earlier) Bioferia de Miraflores: Parque Franscico de Miranda (formerly in Reducto No. 2 Av. Benavides) y Via Expresa. When I’m chasing the fresh organics like from Vacas Felizes, this is where I go.

Sundays, 8:30-2, Surquillo, Mercado 1.BioFeria de Surquillo. Jr. Narciso de la Colina cdra. 5. Lateral al Mercado #1 Surquillo (Ricardo Palma y Av. Paseo de la República)

Sundays, 9-2, Barranco Ecological Fair, Avenida San Martin

Sundays, 9-3, Ecoferia El Polo Green, Centro Comercial El Polo, Santiago De Surco

I’ve also heard about this one: Centro de Ventas de la Universidad Agraria
Av. La Molina s/n, La Molina, 8 a.m. a 12 m.

**** heard as of October 2018**** apparently there is a now a farmers’ market in Jockey Plaza in Surco.

And according to this website, there are others. Sadly the one in Miguel Dasso no longer exists (it’s now located in the Reducto as listed above).

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Pica No Pica

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Three chili sauces. Only one is spicy.

“Pica no pica” is a phrase one hears here in Lima. It translates literally as “spice no spice”  but actually means “seasoned but not spicy.”

So not spicy on the scoville scale but flavorful.

I may start responding with “pica q pica!”