The “Busy” Scene on the Aeolian Islands

Fresh prawns.

The Aeolian islands are called the gourmet islands. I think they may have styled themselves as this as a tourist attraction. Conde Naste Traveler magazine called them this and based the article around a female Michelin star chef who owns Signum on the island of Salina, the second largest of the Aeolian islands. Lipari is the biggest.

The upstairs of the catamaran.

Getting to the islands is by boat or catamaran. Of helicopter if you want. The catamaran from Milazzo on Sicily took under two hours. The port restaurant at Milazzo is really good. Best bread I’ve had, excellent sandwiches, good beer, and well, overall better than they need to be for having a captive audience. The ferry from or to Naples from Salina is about six hours and I wouldn’t recommend it. The air conditioning only worked well on one side and because the Italians have a severe fear of upsetting their digestion, those that had sat over there were wearing their jackets and scarves but refused to move. Even in the windy cold side of the boat, it was still only 80 F or 27 C. The hot side of the boat was 99 F or 37 C (I carry a thermometer with me for just this sort of situation). When I opened up some of the vents to get more air, I had many fingers waggled at me to stop. The toilet also became somewhat of a fetid horror.

A view from one of the Relax Salina Boats.

Getting to and from the islands is fairly easy as there are ferries and local boat companies that stop at the various islands including Stromboli, famous volcanic island. Ask at your hotel or B&B. Everyone knows everyone on these islands so they will all have a cousin or brother or son who has a boat.

The social media director was way fly and hip looking.

But, the islands are famous for their food scene. The restaurants I liked in Santa Marina on Salina were Lo Schiavo, nni’ Lausta, and Mamma Santina. Down in Lingua, there is a restaurant, Il Gambero, on the harbor which runs a shuttle (the dad runs it) to Santa Marina. Try the local speciality called “pane cunzato” a sort of large garlic bread with various toppings. I loved it because they used raw garlic. Although seafood is the speciality, there are vegetarian options on all the menus.

Imagine this fresh tuna from the fish shop.

If you have an opportunity, buy the fresh tuna tartare at the fish shop, Pescharia A Lampara (there is only one fish shop). It’s so fresh and glistens like rubies.

Linen in all sizes.

While resting between meals, buy linen and crochet. If you can afford it. Some of the nice dresses were handmade and cost 700 euro. Be aware that this is small town life so many shops close for lunch. But a few don’t and most have air conditioning. The people are generally friendly. The main street of Santa Marina is mainly pedestrian making for good shopping and eating. And people watching.

View from Hotel Mercanti di Mari

For happy hour, go to the Hotel Mercanti di Mari by the harbor where they have a make your own bruschetta station. Drink wine and admire the view of the harbor.

Unusual bread at the local bakery.

If you want a nightclub, go to the Porto Bello restaurant by the dock. Just be aware that any shenanigans you take home with you will be known all over the island. If you don’t mind adding to the local action, then never mind.

The main street in the morning when the delivery trucks are allowed in. Nni’ Lausta on the left has a secret garden.

The reason many go is for the food and one could just visit Salina and eat well. But, stay a while longer, and become part of the local soap opera scene… I befriended a local, not knowing that he was a local passionate about more than fish. When I described this local casanova to the manager at the place where I was staying, she said with a wise nod that she knew who I was talking about . She added, “he is busy busy all the time”… on an island with as many bikini clad tourists as this one, one can see how he constantly had a fresh “catch.”

One of the many gourmet food stores.

Otherwise, sit back and enjoy chatting with the locals and soaking up the local. If you imagine a BBC feel-good romantic comedy, then you get an idea of what I saw in this little island buzzing with flashing smiles, bronzed arms, and twinkling glances.

Nni’ Lausta’s upstairs terrace is perfect for an assignation. Or just a rest from the heat of the day.

Gluten-Free Eating in Rome

Can a celiac eat pasta, pizza, and gelato? Is a trip to Rome even possible?

First, learn the basic phrase for without gluten — “senza glutine” (sen-za glue-tea-neh) in Italian. While there are many dishes that do not include gluten, such as rice dishes, cross contamination can be a problem so it’s a good idea to explain that you have an allergy. Celiacs is “celiachia” in Italian and the “ce” at the start of the word is pronounced as a “chay” so it’s “chay-lee-ah-chee” but you can show the restaurant this phrase from Celiac Travel which explains that you have celiacs and that you cannot eat food made with wheat or wheat products.

Sono affetto da celiachia (intolleranza al glutine), devo seguire una dieta assolutamente priva di glutine.

Qualsiasi cibo contenente farina/amido di grano (frumento), segale, orzo, avena, farro, spelta, kamut e triticale può causarmi gravi malori.

Luckily, the Italians are obsessed with gut health, so they will feel the tragedy for you, and they will understand. Now, on to the places in Rome where you can eat!

Restaurants:

Mama Eat Lab (100 percent gluten free) – They also have another restaurant called Mama Eat but it is not 100 percent gluten-free.

New Food Gluten Free – Ponte Sisto (100 percent gluten free)

Pantha Rei

La Soffitta Renovatio

Ristorante Il Tulipano Nero

Voglia Di Pizza

Ristorante Pizzeria Il Veliero

Lievito72

Sans de blé

Risotteria Melotti — it is a rice based restaurant

La Scaletta

Pub Cuccagna

Ristorante II Viaggio – gluten and dairy free.

Millennium 

Mangiafuoco Pizza & Grill

Taverna Barberini 

Bakeries:

Le Altre Farine Del Mulino

La Pasticciera

Pandalì

Celiachiamo Lab (also a shop)

Gelato:

Fatamorgana Trastevere

Grom

Fiocco di neve

Gelato G Italiano

Frigidarium

Icecream Shop La Strega Nocciola

The Italian chocolate brand even makes gluten-free chocolate

Read a really good article here. Much of this list is from that site (which includes information about AIC — gluten-free accreditation). This site also rates the places. I also looked at this site which gave a good roundup of gluten-free eats in Rome but more importantly, a list of gluten-free eateries at the airport!

Eat and Shop the Bounty of Bologna

This is knife/kitchen store, horse store (see below)

Looking back on Bologna, I see why people love Bologna. It’s a real city without pretension and it’s a foodie city.

I had an intro food tour with Cook Italy’s Carmelita, carmelita@cookitaly.com. These are the shopping places she recommended. Carmelita runs food tours and cooking classes. In English. Carmelita has incredibly high standards. Hire her if you are one of those people who almost never find anything quite up to scratch.

Simoni, Via Drapperie 5/2a: the deli that still maintains the high standards of yore. They have several stores in the area.

Bruno e Franco – La Salumeria Bologna. Via Guglielmo Oberdan, 16: This is on many a food tour. (also across from a store that sells Reisenthal bags which is not part of the Bologna tour but I like their bags).

Eataly: the one in the bookstore.

Ancient Aguzzeria Horse, Via Drapperie 12. It’s a knife store that now sells all kinds of things for the kitchen. You want to go there. Trust me. The staff are incredibly nice as well.

Enoteca Italia

Eats: I got many recommendations but these were Carmelita’s that I liked.

Impero, Via dell’Indipendenza, 39: bakery with great breakfast options.

Enoteca Italia, Via Marsala 2: wine and a light lunch

Sable Gelato, Via dei Mille 3a (behind the red newsstand): This gelato maker makes super creamy artisanal gelato and he is a renaissance man whose current passion is gelato (he said, “do you know what is the most beautiful thing? freshly made gelato”).

He makes everything in Sable Gelateria

And where to stay (This I found on my own): Il Terrazzo Di San Colombano/la porta rossa, find them online for a good price. Or call them: 347 058 1371 . I found this place online and it’s a great find. It’s on a quiet side street, has a terrace, and for 25 euro per day, a parking spot in the underground garage. The cost is around 200 dollars per night but I think it depends if you pay cash or go through a booking service. The place sleeps six (two full beds in the same room and a queen in the other room). The artwork is too weird for my liking but other than that, I like it.

As for dinner or other places to eat, I wasn’t there long enough. I’ll have to go back. I didn’t like the place that was recommended to me by the apartment owner so I don’t want to recommend them (it was a place on Oberdan street). I have a list of places recommended by my Italian teacher so I’ll write about that another time. Clearly I’ll have to go back.

Pizza, Pinsa, Focaccia, Schiacciata, and Cold?

Pizza is cut with scissors and a spatula.

Pizza in Italy reminds me a bit of that time when my friend, who had never had a wedge salad, ordered one but without the tomatoes or the blue cheese. She was speechless with disbelief when a wedge of iceberg was served to her on a plate. In Italy, a plain pizza, a “pizza bianca,” or “white pizza” is indeed a piece of pizza bread that looks like focaccia… no cheese, no sauce, no toppings (other than salt and oil), and often served cold.

White pizza and red pizza fresh out of the oven. No cheese needed.

During the pandemic, I’ve been keeping pizza in my freezer. After a few weeks of eating all the frozen pizza I’d sequestered in my freezer, I thought that I’d had enough pizza for a while… until I saw a potato and mozzarella slice at Alice (AH-lee-chay).

Alice is a pizza chain.

Now that I live in Italy, some of my friends ask me questions about Italian food expecting that perhaps I have become an expert. Not yet. The most recent question I received was about focaccia and pizza. What is the difference? It turns out that pizza is the type of dough, not so much the type of topping or how it’s served. Even a brioche can be a pizza. At Easter, a large brioche shaped like a panettone is called a “pizza formaggio” and it is a cheese pizza. See photo below.

Pizza formaggio

I actually quite like the bread that is called pizza because it’s made from the pizza dough.

Bread roll made from pizza dought.
Long pizzas are sold by the slice (taglio) in Rome.

This reminded me of the last time I was in Italy when I had a bread called, “schiacciata,” which is was a flat, oil-rich, salty, pillowy dimpled flat bread sold in squares. I recall those dimples of green olive oil and the slick of grease on my chin. It is a Tuscan version of what is known as focaccia in the North. It is a little thinner, and perhaps a little closer to a pizza.  

Cold shrimp salad on a pizza. Ham and cheese pizza (sandwich).

In Rome, the pizza is sold by weight and in rectangles. It doesn’t have to have red sauce or cheese. It doesn’t even have to be warm! Often the pizza is topped with cold salad or sauteed greens. An extremely popular topping is cold mortadella. Pizza is also available as a breakfast item, even mortadella with mayonnaise.

Notice how it’s an oval shape?

There is a style called “pinsa” which is slightly oval and it is not a pizza, it’s a pinsa. Got it? The pinsa is a type of flat bread that is baked first and then topped with fresh ingredients.

This a colorful array of pinsa from Pinsere (small pinsa) before they go in the oven once you order.

So basically a pizza is a type of bread, sometimes cooked with the toppings in the oven and sometimes dressed afterwards. Otherwise, the rest seems to be free to one’s creativity. Except for pineapple. No pineapple on the pizza here in Italy. I really like pineapple on pizza and I don’t even mind corn. A really good pizza here is blue cheese and walnuts. Nuts! Right? Many of the Italian immigrants to the United States were from Naples so the American pizza evolved from the Neapolitan pizza.

A white pizza with porchetta.

When I went on a food tour with a local guide, she confirmed that pizza is about the type of bread. Not what is on it, what temperature it is, or how it’s served.

This lesson pizza will have to be ongoing as I discover more types of pizza.

Testaccio Market

Mercato Testaccio (“mare-cah-toe” “tess-tah-chi-oh”) seems world famous, but I may be getting too “Rome blind” and just assume that everyone has watched 500 videos about Rome. No, you haven’t? Well, if you want, you can watch MY video, on my YouTube channel, about Testaccio Market. And then see where the rabbit hole takes you.

Testaccio market is located in the neighborhood of Testaccio, just south of historic center along the river. This location is the new location which was purpose built. It’s organized and has parking! Here is a good run down from another blog who posted this article.

One thing I really like about markets is the hustle and bustle. With pandemic distancing, it’s lacking some of that. But, it was still lovely to hear Italians talking louder than a hush. Of the markets I’ve been to, Trionfale is larger so I may like that one more. Testaccio feels a little too gentrified.

Seven Restaurants in Lima

Lima is a seventh heaven for food so perhaps that’s why there are so many restaurants with the number seven (siete in Spanish). Here is a list of the ones people ask me about:

Siete, Jirón Domeyer 260, Barranco (around corner from Isolina): high end restaurant.

Lima 27 and 27 Tapas, Calle Santa Luisa 295, San Isidro: restaurant and a tapas restaurant that is connected to the Lima 27 restaurant. (I didn’t like this place — the food was just odd in a not tasty way).

La 73, Av. el Sol 175, Barranco

Siete Sopas, Av. Arequipa 2394, Lince and second location at Av. Angamos 609, Surquillo: This is the 24-7 soup (they have nine soups — soup of the day and the two house soups — in the photo at top is the “sopa criolla” which has beef,noodles, and milk) restaurant chain by La Lucha Sangucheria. The location on Arequipa is the first. Their bread is kind of magical.

10 Best Burgers in Lima

*******Update October 19, 2019****** Since Peruvians love hamburgers, it’s hard to pick the best, since there are so many burgers to try… But, for the fun of it, I will. At most places, the meat patty is about 250 grams. Peruvians like a meaty burger. Not thin patties.

1. Don Doh: Given that one of the co-owners is the butcher who runs Osso, I’d expect the burger to be good. The black bun is slightly chewy and moist due to the squid ink that makes it black. Inside the burger is a good 200 grams and made with chopped kimchi.

eOuAOrXFdlc-4jKO1bsCulBcoIO8r1bTGDSBk5tZXMQa3qWuC_wy1xnBE3Nl69pvYZ_IM4Y244665Tm-dCl1cZz5oa0gqoSCrn575220GTIsm_viYgKD4PB1Lcu9WrW4cBMJcqIe-0oMR65EG6izFCPSLlct9MGiS-zCpbTYZAoRqdrurCFXDS2T0szn-hBztf1DS3taNW6D2d1LVvhW-AlJOlGJcvk2. Osso: It’s a steak house so they should have a good burger. The burger is actually a chopped steak burger. It’s meaty. But, the fries are what makes me keep coming back.

3. Sushi Pop: Thin and made from Angus beef. The patties are more like Five Guys in the U.S. As you can see below, it’s hard to find the patties under the cheese, sauce, and fried onion… but the meat was good even if it was hard to find. Next time I’ll get it without the sauce. Sushi Pop serves the burger on a “bao” or steamed bun.

7in9K6JkiL6u3bt7r7cJQouG4EaFCGFXpfrEn79uYpEMUV8FoRPJeFPBpX42AcLxR7td1EhD0IX7sAwcMfd5pA1SfPdWqoyWQixj2134BrL-Pla3oDtXfMpXWAEOx7Jr-1Z41bKlSX2v_JOZSEQXvuS1O-isabMwP_z971mE5D8xdCYFANAp58cSCsy__WHSMcPZ6u-mn2sNYHAGAvE7wVCexLU2Kso4. Cosme: The burger is good.It’s just another secret thing about Cosme.

5. Papachos: They no longer have a Wagyu or Kobe. The “luxury” Angus burger is a solid burger.  I’m told that many think that the burgers are too salty. I didn’t think so.

6. Juicy Lucy: This burger isn’t that large but it’s a solid tasting burger. The fries are local round potatoes. (This chain is from the same owner of Carnal so at Carnal you can get the sinfully delicious version of the juicy lucy.)

7. Bon Beef: The burger is a burger much like at Fridays or Chilis. Bon Beef is that sort of place.

8. Django Burgers, Hipolito unanue 101, Miraflores (10th block of Ejercito): good burger. so so fries.

Okay, eight. Then there are these other places that have been recommended to me or that I have been to:

Cafe A Bistro: This gas station bistro was recommended to me for their burger. I thought it was okay until I hit a piece of cartilage (set the grind on a finer size!). Then I stopped.

El Jefe: It’s a burger but I didn’t find the meat tasty and it had that mealy cardboard texture that makes me think of certain fast food chains…

Food Rockers (not Fuddruckers): Located a bit off the beaten track in San Borja, this place has a burger but it’s the black ice cream that’s worth the visit. More about that in another blog posting.

Quisso: First raclette based restaurant in Lima. They melt cheese on everything including an artisanal burger freshly ground for the restaurant.

I have not been to this place but, Hamburguesas Artesanales, Av. Gral. Eugenio Garzón 977, Jesús María, won the 2018 Burger Fest.

Where to Eat Seafood in Lima

Recently, I got asked about suggestions for where to eat seafood in Lima.

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Eating seafood is an integral part of life in Lima. And no, it’s not all raw.

First, take the recommended fish of the day — it will be the freshest. Also, remember that salmon is not from Peru (in the highlands, they do have a lake trout which is similar). While they eat a lot of tuna here, it is more in the Japanese “Nikkei” style food, and most recently, in the rise of the Poke! Typical seafood dishes to try here are: ceviche (done in many ways but go with “el classico” — although now they do versions of ceviche with “pork rinds of seafood” = deep fried seafood) and tiradito (carpaccio of fish). The scallops are so tender that they’ll make you go weak at the knees (“conchas a la parmesana” is classic and resounding puts to bed any idea that seafood and cheese aren’t delicious together). Peruvians love soup of all kinds but I find many of them are too fiercely fishy for my palate. Most places will serve fish in various other styles including , “a lo macho” which is when the fish is served with manly red spicy seafood sauce — note: almost nothing in Peru is spicy like in Thailand — it’s just a touch of spice unless you eat one of the chili peppers).

Try some of these restaurants (and keep in mind that most cevicherias close at 5 p.m. or earlier as traditionally fish is only fresh for breakfast or lunch. I’m trying to think of when I’ve seen a Peruvian order ceviche at night). Lastly, Peruvians love franchising so don’t worry that many of these places are chains. I’ve listed the daytime places in relative order of “But, it’s RAW! And I’m willing to try it… but only one tine of my fork…” to “No AC and no ingles! Gotta talk to the local sitting next to me? Bring it on!”

“But, it’s RAW! And I’m willing to try it… but only one tine of my fork…”

El Mercado (considered the best restaurant by many) – international star chef and this place usually ranks on the “50 Best” list. Line up at 12:15 or make a reservation.

La Mar (by Gaston Acurio) – I like this place because it’s got it all. Also good lighting for photos. Go at 12:30 p.m. or 4 p.m. if you don’t want to wait.

El Segundo Muelle (a seafood chain)

El Seniorio de Sulco (old school place that old-time Limenos go to)

Francesco (very old school)

La Red – my favorite old school place – part of the legend in making the Lima food scene so great. Also, they have a good “lomo saltado” for those who don’t eat fish. The sons of the legend opened La Isolina (located in Barranco and open at night) which also has great food, including fish.

La Preferida (this is my secret place for fettucine pasta with a creamy seafood sauce)

 

“No AC and no ingles! Gotta talk to the local sitting next to me? Bring it on!”

La Picanteria – Internet famous. Good food too. One has to buy the whole fish by weight and then choose two methods of preparation. The inside of the restaurant is not scary but the location of this restaurant is in Surquillo right behind the market, so going there is probably by taxi. If you are the sort of person who visits the market (for photos and to try new fruits), then the restaurant is only two streets away (but hold your buddy’s hand when crossing the street, and look both ways).

La Leche – hidden gem in Surco and San Isidro.

Toke Pez (hole in the wall)

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If you want to eat seafood at night (most restaurants serve fish and seafood but serving ceviche at night is a sign of a modern restaurant catering to foreigners, or moving with the times since there is this thing called refrigeration):

Pescados Capitales – a chain of high-end seafood restaurants

Las Brujas de Cachiche – open late and has everything Peruvian on the menu

Cosme (also one of those secret places not on the “50 Best” lists). Not many fish dishes but they do ceviche, tiradito, and a cooked fish of the day dish.

 

Lastly, eating seafood in Lima may spoil your ability to eat seafood in other places.

M’s Adventures Top 10 Eateries in Lima

mN13TrEyw5UrAwtJ5lvt2SBByNATlxfKv17-CkBs_iItDp8qTi5Q0Iqne_0NpyRqFIHSnRMfMfpod_JkGqQNqSBenBVKl2q3wmR9v09aBt9bqZG23-V_0n00q4NWYLdW_IoFw91jK_vs6ZgpjWP7tfbP_1aewZLBqaBhTPA6ouOUdskjk7MtGKci-I’m likely to get flack for my top 10 list… When I go out to eat, I look for good food, good service, good ingredients, reliability and consistency. I have not yet been to 500 places but here are my current top 10. And, yes, I have been to Central, Rafael, Astrid y Gaston, and Maido.

  1. El Pan de la Chola
  2. La Preferida
  3. La Mar
  4. La Isolina
  5. Cosme
  6. Osaka
  7. La Red
  8. La Mora
  9. La Segunda Muelle
  10. Frida (best newcomer)

This list may change as I get to Don Doh and other places of fame.

Restaurants Open for Sunday Dinner in Lima

fullsizeoutput_1bf***Updated February 19, 2020 to update Spizza’s new address**** So it’s Sunday night and you want to go out for dinner… Here are some of the places that I found. The restaurants are listed by how early you can eat dinner so that if you feel like eating linner/dinner at 5 pm, you can. Many of these restaurants are located in hotels or in Laromar Mall but I’ve noted that if that is the case. More power to you going out to eat on a school night!

MIRAFLORES/SAN ISIDRO/LINCE/MAGDALENA

Siete Sopas, corner of Angamos and Via Expresa, as well as Av. Arequipa 2394, Lince (Open 24 hours; seven days a week): This is a soup restaurant from the chain La Lucha Sangucheria. They have three soups each day. They always have “criolla” and “diet” (chicken soup) and then the day’s soup. It’s advertised on the wall outside so you can see the soup of the day from outside (or just have it memorized like some of my friends… “today’s Tuesday, so not MY soup day.”).

La Vista Restaurant in the JW Marriott Hotel, Malecón de la Reserva 615, Miraflores (Sun: 6AM–11PM)

Franklin, Av. Alvarez Calderón 198, San Isidro (6:30 a.m. — midnight, 365 days a year): American food. Named after Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Paprika Restaurante Lima in the Costa del Sol Hotel, Av. Gral. Salaverry 3060 (Sun: 6AM—11PM)

Social Restaurant & Bar in the Hilton Hotel, Av. la Paz 1099, Miraflores (Sun: 6:30AM–1AM)

La Tiendecita Blanca (Swiss Peruvian), Av Jose Larco 111, Miraflores (Sun: 7AM–12AM)

Tanta in Larcomar Mall, Circuito de Playas 3773, Miraflores (Sun: 8AM–10PM)

Mangos Restaurante in Larcomar Mall, Malecón de la Reserva 610 (Sun: 8AM–12AM)

La Lucha Sanguchería Criolla in Larcomar Mall (casual sándwich shop) and at various locations including Diagonal 139, Miraflores (Sun: 8AM–12AM)

Restaurante Vivaldi, Av. Camino Real 415, San Isidro (Sun: 8AM—10PM)

Sarcletti Dos De Mayo, Av. Dos de Mayo 1297, San Isidro, (Sun: 8:30AM—11PM)

La Vaca Loca in Larcomar Mall, C.C 18,, Malecón de la Reserva 610 (Sun: 11AM–12AM)

Papacho’s Miraflores (burgers), also in Larcomar Mall and this location: Av. la Paz 1045, Miraflores (Sun: 11AM-10PM)

La Rosa Náutica, Espigón Miraflores, Lima 18, Circuito de Playas (Sun: 12PM–12AM)

Delfino Mar, Jorge Chávez 509, Miraflores (Sun: 12PM-10PM)

Bao? (café with Asian sandwiches), 15074, José Domingo Choquehuanca 411 (Sun: 12PM–11PM)

Restaurante Alfresco, Av 28 de Julio 331 (Sun: 12PM–11PM)

KO Asian Kitchen in Larcomar Mall, Local 207, Malecón de la Reserva 610 (Sun: 12PM–12AM)

Bon Beef, Av. Pardo y Aliaga 596, San Isidro (Sun: 12PM—11PM)

Antica Pizza, Av. Dos de Mayo 732, San Isidro (Sun: 12PM—12AM)

Baco & Vaca, Av. Dos de Mayo 798, San Isidro (Sun: 12PM—12AM)

La Bodega de la Trattoria, Av. Dos de Mayo 715, San Isidro (Sun: 12:00PM—11PM)

Dánica, Av. Emilio Cavenecia 170, San Isidro (Sun: 12:30PM—10PM)

Restaurant Cuarto y Mitad, Av. Los Conquistadores 1266, San Isidro (Sun: 12:30PM—11PM)

SPizza, Luis Arias Schereiber 147, Miraflores (Sun: 12:30PM—10PM)

San Cerefino (Italian-Peruvian), Av Dos de Mayo 793, San Isidro (Sun:12:30PM—9:30PM)

Makoto Sushi Bar & Restaurante, Av. Dos de Mayo 585, San Isidro (Sun:12:30PM—11PM)

Fuji Japanese Food, Av. Paseo de la República 4084, Miraflores (12–3PM; 6–11PM)

La Trattoria di Mambrino in Larcomar Mall (Sun: 12PM-4PM; 6:20 PM–12AM)

Dhaasu, Comida Hindu: Avenida de la Republica de Panama 245.

Tragaluz in the Belmond Hotel, Los Carolinos 118, Miraflores (Sun: 7PM—11PM)

Restaurant Huaca Pucllana, Cdra 8, Calle General Borgoño (Sun: 12PM–4:30PM, 7PM–12AM)

Barra Lima Restaurante, Av. Los Conquistadores 904, San Isidro (Sun:12PM—5PM; 7PM—11:30PM)

La Locanda in the Swissotel Lima, Av. Santo Toribio 173 Vía Central 150, Centro Empresarial San Isidro (Sun: 12:30PM–3:30PM, 7PM–11PM)

Gioconda Restaurante, Av. Dos de Mayo 570, San Isidro (Sun:11AM—4PM; 7PM—11PM)

BARRANCO

La 73, Av. el Sol 175, Barranco (Sun: 12PM–10PM)

Cala, Circuito de Playas, Barranco (Sun: 12PM–12AM)

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CENTRAL LIMA

Cafe Museo Larco, Av. Simón Bolivar 1509, Cercado de Lima (Sun: 9AM–10PM)

 

SURQUILLO/SAN BORJA

La Panka, Av. Villaran 753, Lima (Sun: 12PM–11PM)

 

SURCO/LA MOLINA

El Hornero carnes, Av Circunvalacion del Golf 408, La Molina 00012 (Sun: 11:30AM–10:30PM)

El Charrua, Av. Javier Prado Este 5898, La Molina (Sun: 12PM–12AM)

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Where to Eat in Lima When There Are a Bajillion People in Town

If you have visitors to town in Lima at the same time as a few thousand other people… here are some places that you might actually get in without a reservation. All on my list of 100 Must-East Restaurants. Done without too much formatting for easy viewing — For Peruvian food: Cosme, La Segunda Muelle; La Preferida; Amoramar; Las Brujas de Cachiche; La Lucha Sangucheria (sandwiches); El Rocoto; Paseo Colon; Rasson; and Chifa Titi (Chinese Peruvian). Italian: La Morelia, Fornaria 850 and Spizza. And when out in San Borja, these non-Peruvian places: Cafe Mozart, Aji555, and Viet.

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A Vietnamese style coffee, much needed when entertaining visitors.