The Superstar Chefs of Peru

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Zq5S8va0Vj2cM6apCWWsmC22RRlYquXH4VOn--CdWuK5h6w3SXtpihf6H_3CqdzUVmP6m2OxWmqN25abOougMAAUgH-38YBl0DNVVKUZgtLFYNzqA6uSIAPFUfAHg4ImGYsH8B7vTdZFJjiJQD55c2HrM5BP-Rqgt7VZ-yUNVwHhySWNyjyey7ljzwGaston Acurio (La Mar, Astrid y Gaston, Panchita, Tanta, Madam Tusan, etc,) is the businessman of the chef trinity. The others are Virgilio Martinez (Central and Mil) and Rafael Osterling (Rafael, El Mercado, and Felix Brasserie). Virgilio is the genius of the food scene (all photos are from Central) and Rafael is an excellent cook.

iOz60rZKy2XZs0TmBBkarEdcXeYI-dly1xf3aq40czwUnu0jFE59ake4iF_h5BTuSTcyP-FkaXVoX51pDUs-i7SWXqlDubHQWg6mEO27kKbob2dSxg0Dm60ix0-t9kWmCwRvMagLgYhVRRPUXADx8UdMXb-zs4EYL4KLjlQAMgOcQPhHAgOMzBosC8The newest addition is Mitsuharu ‘Micha’ Tsumura of Maido, currently one of the top restaurants in the world.

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Andre Patsias is next…

Brunch in Lima – “Bronche”

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From Homemade

An aside: I’m contributing a word to Peruvian Spanish: Bronche — to rhyme with Lonche. Brunch is a new entry in the Peruvian daily food schedule so the Peruvians call brunch “bruench” based on the gringo term. I think it would be cuter if they called it “bron-chay”to rhyme with their term for tea time. Just my suggestion… **** July 28, 2018**** I heard a waiter say this word today! And I have a witness!

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From Las Vecinas

For a late night culture, it’s a little odd that the Limenos haven’t embraced brunch yet. Most of the places that serve “Gringo style brunch” — eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes, waffles, and so on, stop serving breakfast food items before noon (this is utterly wrong because the essence of brunch is that breakfast items can be had until 2 or 3 in the afternoon. Here are a few places (not hotel restaurants or American chain restaurants) that serve brunch… okay, the two places.

Homemade, Revett 259, Miraflores. Closed on Sundays. All food is homemade.

Las Vecinas, Domeyer 219, Barranco. All the food is homemade including the pasta on the lunch menu (which is available at noon during the same time as the brunch menu). Most of the food is healthy and organic. I’d like more grease.

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Eggs on potatoes from Homemade

I will update this posting if I find any more places. Or a place that serves American style breakfast sausages.

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Potatoes with fresh cheese from Las Vecinas