Mani-Pedi in Lima

manipediThankfully, I may have found my mani-pedi person here in Lima. Just as I left Bogota, I found “my” mani-pedi person there. Then I went on the road and had to search all over again. When I got to Lima, I went to a salon that I had been to before. Sadly, I nearly got a new hole buffed on my nonexistent bunion (it would have been funny if no blood had been shed).

Now, I’ve found my person: Monica Corneja. Monica is a good advertisement for her business with nice long, healthy, painted nails.

60 Soles (60 Peruvian Suns = about 17 U.S. dollars) for a mani-pedi at your house. Monica only needs a bucket to soak your feet and a small stool/box/etc. to sit on while carving the bunions and coarse skin off your feet. She takes pride in her ability to feel the rough areas of your feet.

Monica doesn’t speak English (so it’s a good opportunity to practice Spanish). Her telephone/whatsapp number is 950-070-925.

The White And Red – Soccer in Peru

Now that Peru made the finals for the soccer/football (the “beautiful game”) World Cup next year, the color combination of the national soccer team will be even more apparent. The soccer jersey is a red or white jersey with a sash across the front. It is called a “blanca y roja” or a “white and red” and any version of white and red is considered good luck. According to legend, the national colors of Peru were chosen when José de San Martín, in 1820, saw the wings of pink (red) flamingos on the coast off Ica, to the south of Lima. The photo shows Marinera dancers from the north, dancing through Mistura 2017.

IMG_0985Congratulations, Peru!

Traffic in Lima – Is it the Worst?

I’ve heard lots of people tell me that Lima has the worst traffic… but then, Cairo, Dhaka, Bangkok, Delhi, LA, Santo Domingo, and a few others all claim that title. Even in Port of Spain, they claim to have the worst. I was inclined to say that Dhaka still holds the title. But, there are certain elements to Lima traffic that make it a contender — fear and boredom. In almost all cities with bad traffic, the “me first” aggression is the only way to get ahead, and in Lima, this is readily visible every time you step outside. During rush hour, the sheer numbers of cars all trying to go left from a right lane, or right from a left lane, or through red lights, is normal. There are many traffic cops and they will often override the traffic lights with their light sabers and whistles. The chances of getting in a traffic accident are high.

7t0oa9FNRs9oLFuAChnMfVsSt3iVJCV5USRD5s4kc3EmS_GwYFGNMpi8XabFDV7xWJ-6DfaTd0mt8XeZ4G4qN2JrivKtRwOAqEBxONsOyOuLac9EfDtw_mX9NUNz9kCkMs0SPr2GEyyIt4hGjZOqZktk3V2sOe0IRXIXoD5wKvGXILRm1mAx2BsAoPThen there’s the boredom. The hours spent in traffic (the painting above shows a day with light traffic). It can take an hour to go five miles. Apparently, Lima has grown as a city (9.5 million and counting) with commercial growth in the urban areas instead of expanding outwards. There is a business area to the south of the city but that seems to be it. Everyone else is commuting in to the city. When I say that it’s boring, I mean only if you get carsick from using your smart phone. Otherwise, if you keep your phone out of sight, and keep your wits about you, then…also, the traffic sights are not as interesting here. No camels, colorful rickshaws, overloaded carts, cattle, beggars, and so on. Just cars ad libitum. Ha.

The Bare Necessities – When You Gotta Go

a-WWqFFzJQsa8iEzZO52pQrTkNOZFDv5ULekHEXZca_HAU13qcsxYjF24xr8yuGzVGUFVHqEGFZtdrzHS6S_FZa6u765gtIXtSBbf1uahgeo39OEEzOl7APFP_v6ufy4yft-y1WAcJKPrhyosd3CvalgMHwBW-rXzIC2Rc20vLTDJQjyK0KuxlfiH9One of the “joys” about traveling is always looking for the bathroom/restroom/WC/toilet. Sometimes traveling seems like The Great Toilet Hunt. The photo from my day shopping local in Nassau shows a little outhouse with a big name. I think I would have gone with “manse” or “palace” just for the hyperbole.

Gotta go. More anon.