Recipe for How to Make Chicken Causa

XU3avk8OGYzE2BvymEO0cqX7JC3EApteoULsKRp-swftCuO1LQVh8PznHyIB_0tFW5GSJK_G4u-a23MFnOx51aFsQpS9iT7HyKDke133bCBpOKF5LDeKv_PRHA4P2hIJ-tD_Yll44odUhZ2nqvebbp_uCAgvR6bO4954dd0_jELqrelMsvFin--BBH30ObT7Iz0GrWBVTT5xjbHa7kcH-BI_TYMqo0bA classic potato dish in Lima is “causa” which translates as the “cause” or fight.  But, it can also mean “buddy.”  I took some photos while a buddy of mine and her mom made “artisanal” causa… as in homemade (which is one of the points that mega-phone of Peruvian cuisine, Gaston Acurio champions, although you can follow his recipe here). It took them more than three hours.  Here is the recipe (sort of) as the grandma making the dish doesn’t use measurements (hence the artsy part of this) and it took so long that I went off to take a nap.

uz3g1XgDc1BZWt3I3c41Q1FNkD3_rx9Gso_XNPxeQ1GU0UkV50Wk9zXxcVxMGwLstDEqeCHBFZ_xAzXFRqrppeLa6M20ApAihFIsesPp90oTe5O0YDbFjMzYv2l9ZNZTLjzcYBvI6rH2TVDx7XWtv6bxaSKbbX8FFu_W_E2auGnaVzoTM1HPfJ5RQxM9A_Ayz5r2hcNDTWDJPJtDV-Y8MaK4s2CMXqq4 large chicken breasts

24 large Peruvian Yellow potatoes

a cup of celery

a large carrot

2 white onions

yellow Peruvian chili paste

salt & pepper

2 avocado

4 tomatoes

red pepper

parsley

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  1. Cook the chicken in water with chopped onion, celery, and carrot, and a pinch of salt (large pieces are fine). Boil until chicken breasts are cooked (40 minutes). Pull out chicken breasts and let cool.
  2. Boil yellow potatoes. When boiled, drain and peel as soon as you can as the peel is easier to remove when the potato is hot.
  3. Remove the strings off the celery and chop very fine.
  4. Chop half a white onion very fine.
  5. Chop/pull the cooked chicken breast.
  6. Mix the chicken meat with mayonnaise, salt, pepper, onions, and celery.
  7. Crush by hand the cooked and peeled potatoes. Crush until they are smooth and have a creamy texture. Add olive oil, salt, pepper, lime juice, and chili paste. Keep tasting it until it tastes right.
  8. In a large lasagna pan (or use a glass, whatever), build your causa. Bottom layer is potato, then the chicken salad, then avocado, then tomato, and then another layer of potato. Use a fork to make a design on the top and decorate with parsley, red pepper slivers, and black olives. Eat straight away or keep in fridge until it “settles” and gets even tastier.

EKsqBPiV_FTcNBYX9aRQnk02n7LKbEFZIvmo87qWEjO5Es4qDmYY4RAREOhPDEjuOI7qMdER6VbrcK8in88q2x27oa4zcGMfgZz_78eQ21Pe-5yAP9y9soVaPg0uYz1iVL54n9GQZSJrRu4DnH3PXS5ighTHF9LvCHIQ6ntXAhl3KAWvmzNS-bSAiIk2H6ZRgnFcAS1w21sCu4bswRE_MsWZjlIHGaTThere are other types of causa with crab, shrimp, egg, but chicken salad is typical in Lima. The Lima thing to do is to eat this as an appetizer and then follow with “aji de gallina” which is rice with stewed chicken, another classic dish from Peru.

 

Kharla, The Best Massage Therapist in Peru

Dps2loB4Vpavh2xYLs2ipNEBtCd290IpnY26Pj8v_VzA_bmxkZl2J0m964TkeeXmwAPx5JBNiif8jOJHb6B9WxbnjcrJbG-MARUNAwtkvuuUWu5BokfHV4AyxZYDrm31R7nHUth-nRoGAGeRQGYQRNSpAjI50-QmpYzACKGI8GkRX9uOMRoG32h5SEK2-LM8qUpVkTKDjLn_pdT-Kyy1-nSodjFoWQB******Update: April 17, 2019***** Sadly (for us), Kharla will not be available in Lima for the next couple of years. But, when she returns, watch out for great things!

Kharla is probably the best massage therapist in Peru (how’s that for a claim?). Kharla is U.S. trained and she speaks English. Most importantly, she is gifted — magically so — with the ability to feel your pain. Once she feels your problem area, she works to resolve it. Call her at 1-980-386-892 to make the hurt go away.

Kharla charges 150 soles ($50) for an hour which is double the average price. She brings the massage table to your house unless you have your own. She can do as fancy spa-like massages (with scent, music, special sheets, heated blankets, etc. if you have them) but she has found that the basics are usually what people want. That said, I play zen music when I get a massage. Currently, Kharla is using an organic coconut oil on me and I like that it’s smooth without being sticky.

Just as I had a great massage therapist in Bogota, I’m glad to have found a great one here. Fortunately, there is a wide array of massage options in Lima including the blind massage therapists, but, I like Kharla. She keeps me tuned and humming.

 

 

Sri Lankan Tea Tasting in Lima

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The tea tasting costs 25 soles. The tasting is only Mlesna brand tea, one of the leading brands of tea in the world. This is the only Sri Lankan tea shop in Peru. The teacher was clearly bewitched by her time in Sri Lanka and that shows in her presentation. I have been to tea plantations in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh (although, I never got around to writing about that part because I was too interested in other aspects of Sylhet) so I sort of understood her fascination.

The store is filled with artwork, cups, plates, bags, and many other things to buy. It is a bit like an artists collective as the artists also own and work in the store.

I’d say to go on a South Asia kick and eat at Dhaasu before or after…

 

Coffee Tasting in Lima – Alpha to Omega

hpnxbod0onpvzyc33ukcakzdtsv3nd7_ecxehcvqqdxokod0ukcp6zdvmbrdsuf9ubre5etbsfemsakdowuwhcr5p0nzubr-lf4gv_fxriqgnwj6_b0jwe0govni_4jinuezdd_coxbfaz8bgfyfjpdgotlkfqr7l7j_frmn8jjfbq-_4sotqplpzjI organized a coffee tasting with the guys from Artidoro Rodriguez coffee. After five hours of learning about coffee and drinking coffee, I was too caffeinated to write this blog posting… I realized how little I know about coffee. For the food geeks, there is a coffee tasting certification class in Lima (one week for eight months–not sure why they don’t do a two month class). Anyway, back to what I didn’t know…. Notice in the photo below that there is some magical ratio of weight of ground coffee to water at a certain temperature (I think this is why the Brits say, “water from a freshly boiled kettle”).

brfmvt3pkp_vrir5694d8ojao2lyr5mkilb7xtxvqi8dw6nthmbdf46omagr2bur8dj4ikdz5wzvq-oobk8y5u1b4ssexdm4att3gg_d0jyajwxyglbtshnekvrzri3boy_1rqavemjt9mx58cidyssofiyl9-ctsyhwq6vif2hqpc9lv1zczs7ogxThe coffee tasting class cost 100 soles (about $30) per person. It was planned from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. but we got a five hour class, freebies, coffee (duh!) and so much info that I had a buzz not solely from the coffee! The owners, Felix and Julian, are experts in tasting and roasting respectively. Felix is the grandson of Artidoro Rodriguez so a legend in the making (Juan Valdez was made up by marketeers!). You heard it here!

ck_gg9o4_pmvmxly_y-5h6jrafmnkar10zbojykcqevhm0xbhxvwxacxdhwvcn9wgrjranve-uhvveju7cystubxmhpx-kas17nwrd8cqlhljuxbyvwhvvtxdfxc0h4ffvuftrpxeo3tjy7aocphhfafmosotbyfiuy_ova-wpij11wklzrlinhcsrI set up the class with Julian via email. The class was in Spanish as Felix feels more comfortable in Spanish. Julian’s English is good so he translated when he could. Plus, I had my secret superpower with me (a bilingual friend who is professional level simultaneous translator level, and a subject matter expert to boot!). We tried more than ten brands of coffee and around six methods of making coffee. As it was a tasting, we could choose to not swallow the coffee and spittoons were provided… but I drank the coffee (hence the buzz).

9t5q9-bs1osqtlr9o9vxawhu3ntqwwryvdzjgc6pmagfj36hqwwspqmrorm0rbwehzze5s45zmdvk3tbqpm632speuugo20civf0tmiuv8plr9aimuigezbpgir_6mwy_bxapta7ct1nrt8bfdu7c1zvigewkpvw3l-tjlbpzvk_sblqgshwxv1unrWe learned so much that I can’t recall most of it. But, there are two types of coffee beans and Peru has lots of areas where both kinds (robusta and arabica) of beans can be grown to produce gourmet coffee. We learned about weighing our coffee when we make it. We learned that there is a coffee grading scale from zero to 100 points. 80 or above is gourmet. Aridoro Rodriguez is 84 (no  shame in that!). Coffee from 60 to 80 is commercial coffee. Below 60… fuggedaboutit. We learned that shiny beans are no good. Shiny beans have been over roasted, one way to compensate for deficiencies. Notice the shiny burned look of the two groups in the photo below. The smallest bunch of beans are roasted correctly. No oily sheen. Just a healthy luster.

y_aq8gg5cnd3slkdznrwwkungden1qxwkky1tz7kjubqsu4tqa2juijh4untex0pc4tpjcnxsn4jc07agejzpdjlk6eqnrxr07muj7rggkoqum4xctq2jq8rgo8grqgq2lumygasgzadwpsqhcyxsap8zymfxzrilsggobxxgsvb7snp3eqm5zpyynWe learned that slurping is good when tasting coffee. We looked at runty beans called “snails” and how they are picked out as a specialty. Just smaller, uglier, but with equal potential (some deep zen going on here, amiright?).

6e3hxhwt92tcc2kgoq4e9ztntjfznlszfd68phrgsix4x_unin3e2imwp2puu1jvgpf4a8mixmrrijvi_ivkey-2nfzynqhxd2difxifzmawszyofp-qscvcap_zw8onfvvj5ctmmwdt1idns6hte39dcvydc4olwy2xg8_netf-e5n3h3v8ueifgdWe learned that beans need to be separated before roasting so they roast at the same degree. That it’s a matter of seconds from the “first pop” of the first bean roasting to the full on fireworks of popping, and, that in those ten seconds, the coffee roaster can make or destroy a batch of coffee. A roast lasts around eight minutes but I can’t recall the exact details. We also learned that after roasting, coffee grounds should “exhale” for eight hours before being used to brew coffee. We learned about “fragrance” and “aroma” and all the other ways to know one’s coffee. We even learned about coffee “tea” (see raisin-like things next to weak cup of liquid in photo below), and then our minds were blown.

vgzs3l3bykenfekexnqn95bfizn14dimdpuwq66xsw1e72te7oqehh8piaasp0iyjb4kkgjnkq035nwdfnszrv9rbsgzuwj7wgrcyfbmifpvrvl4g7sr6tmdmnet5n8euke11u6alynvohtxudtjzsqqpxyn8slxfqhwq5vwijp2ihepcddd1tilqsWe learned even more. About people, livelihoods, the environment, pride in product, taste, and that Felix and Julian are looking to open up a coffee bar somewhere in Miraflores. We learned of the coffee places approved of by Felix. We sniffed… we sipped… we giggled… we roared with laughter… we… take the class! Learn. Get caffeinated. Get mo’ on joe!

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O-M-ega. This just got deep.

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Drink up, my friends, may your cup runneth over. In the best of company.

Kuelap – 10,000 Monumental Steps!

RRtWEL4ekhQ5e9hCh89oAcmbuJtmRcHllsNmx3MxzihyObYVd_N94ag6vCdt6jzpjcwkw2ji27uG4aN_9pEBPDYs9OP-CRLE5UpOfS83hJi8lxHUu74V86wWTXqnnFeH6wZmR-nW2strbfEDb_6TIifq4QYzwR2ShwyZxZ7Zjghuwoi4S3jVfHUB52The hot spot to visit in Peru is still Machu Picchu. But, when you have done that, you might want to see the newest hot spot — Kuelap! Cuelap/Kuelap is located up near the town of Chachapoyas in a region called Amazonas, not to be confused with the Amazon river area. Kuelap is older than Machu Picchu and it’s not as majestic but it’s also got a few million fewer visitors (not that it felt that way!). Chachapoyas is up at 8,000 feet so be prepared to suffer for the view.

IMG-5725Kuelap is nearby and one can take Peru’s first cable car or “teleferico” up to the base of the archaeological site. One takes a bus to the cable car, then the 20 minute cable car ride over the ravine, then a three kilometer walk up flat stone steps. If you have good knees and are relatively fit, you can get up to the citadel and through in a bit over an hour. If you have bad knees, you can also take a horse up to the base of the citadel. If you want to walk all the way up and have bad knees… it can take two hours. There are many rest stops and nice views along the way, but it is an uphill walk. All the way.

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IMG-5718But, at the base at the end of the cable car ride, where you buy your tickets, is a cafe, a museum, souvenirs, and lots of walls at just the right height for sitting on. The cafe may have one of the best views around but they don’t seem to advertise that.

IMG-5711There are many things to see in the Chachapoyas area including the famous Gocta Falls, but more about that another time.

 

Kaleydo Bespoke Shoes – Buy While She’s Still in the “I Knew Her When” Stage — Before She’s Famous!

5-52vNr8wSSv46T1ZBvfO5VX_AkAdzsouTXQpy00CZ0Bwgx2JBpis1V2XI2s9UlW9YnL1tyzJmQX2nClKpYirsW5HowoUSlBSM5D_e7ABgNrMmY5J5qSK8XLFwR9ftZxR9SaHG76o1mBDO62BvIN5d4xwgPuzVovIGy0mS9VI4KxkPeAlSv_3LoXGACarla Leon and her brand, Kaleydo, is in her second year as a shoe designer. For now she’s got a shop in San Borja, here in Lima, Peru. She makes fashionable handmade shoes made-to-measure for $112.

bl42IkG7yPxdw4AliMdTsa6jqMeykAWH9B4IgyIC9HQkmPmVHfLE86PoHDM-58i0t1GCN2-VCJJIlId90bCEfmR8O7-2UQiYUAyuEiSeGZbzXkbIOz-36cQylpUKnSFQmG6AEz_0ZW0eKpOnU9_SNkBJMWR4UZ62u_kcNSu0-yw9g-0uiAWExM24dJOddly, I got added to a fashionista group… and when Kaleydo was recommended to me, I immediately nixed the idea saying that I’d given up on bespoke shoes because after having them made in Bangladesh, Vietnam, and Colombia, I no longer believed that anyone could make me a shoe that I could use. Apparently, Carla takes this as a challenge and will not stop until the customer is satisfied. So, I gave her a try.

6zoJS9X0ddwB3bs2FbOP2AZ0otq7L3ybPuesA2FU-tLP46yn0k2vGhZ2W1CFcvMrJ5qreQOg1e-VNAOZzP7FEDzsoEyUnj4CYkvbd-95C7XJus1u-qiBj5D-m3eER5bt-bj3D20pJKR8oeb-guvkfcXGuSDtrWBX7LYQzQlzYrdPIm3OJmxuChX82BCarla’s showroom/shop is on a third floor walkup beside a pharmacy at Avenida San Luis 2033, apartment 204, San Borja. There is no indication that it’s a shop so you have to know where you are going. Carla doesn’t really speak English so it’s best to have some Spanish skills or take a friend with some Spanish skills when you go. Buy by appointment only.

While Carla’s designer shoes are all made with heels, she does also do really plain flat boring shoes! That’s what I’m getting. She can do any combination of her heels, toes, width, height, color, etc. completely completely completely custom made. And lots of sneakers. She has many brides who get pink heels made and matching sneakers for after the ceremony. Carla also makes boots and those cost 550 soles or $163. The shoes take about two weeks to be made but it depends on how customized they are. One can also buy the shoes off the shelf if they fit. Yes, she takes credit cards.

Carla likes to meet her clients the first time they come for custom made shoes. When I told Carla that when she was famous and had shops all over the world, she wouldn’t be able to measure every foot… she insisted, sweetly, that she would never want to give up tailoring the shoes to the person. She is an artist who loves her craft. With her logo of a peacock shaped like a shoe and her Tiffany colored bags, I predict that she will soon be a “I knew her when…”

“Turron” Cake for the Lord of Miracles

IMG_0450In Peru, in October, the Lord of Miracles (el Señor de los Milagros) is celebrated with a cake called a “turrón de Doña Pepa” which is a type of shortcake, with hints of anise and sticky with honey, covered in color sprinkles and stars. In the 17th century, during an earthquake which leveled Lima, one painting of Jesus remained intact. Other miracles were attributed to this painting and people began to venerate it. Every year, during October, this painting is taken on processions (with the faithful wearing purple and asking for miracles) in the streets of Lima.

And people eat turrón. It is available all year round but look for this heavy weight to make its appearance everywhere in October.

Do You Speak Castillian?

The Spanish is slightly different here in Peru. First of all, it’s not Spanish. It’s “castellano” which is a result, I’m guessing, from when the conquistadors came over from Castille. The Peruvians use an incredible amount of slang, but I’m not sure if it’s more than everyone else. Now that I have dreams in Spanish (many of which “no entiendo”), some Lima specific terms are becoming part of my daily language. Here are a few of them:

de frente: in Spanish class, we learned “derecha” for “right” and “de recho” for “straight on” — that won’t work here. If you say “de recho” to a taxi driver here, they will assume you said to turn right and got the vowel wrong. If you want them to go straight, say “de frente”. Not to be confused with “en frente” which is across”.

A doubler – to turn.

Playa: parking lot (yes! so you will find “parking beaches” far away from the water).

Cobrer – to cost/pay.

IMG_7175Palta: avocado

Maracuya: it’s passionfruit but I have to recall the English because that heady scent seems much more of a “mah-ra-coo-yay” for some reason.

Ficho: fancy

Guinasso: F&*(*ing awesome. I think that’s how it’s spelled…

Hallar: hitch a ride

Sencilla (Efectivo/Plata/dinero in other forms of Spanish): for petty cash or small change. There is a lot of fake money here so people prefer coins  and small bills.
Barrio versus district: seems to be a matter of “class” — when I referred to Miraflores as my barrio, I was met by giggles of embarrassment. It’s apparently not a barrio, and certainly not in Castillian!

 

Business Cards in Lima

isTqgskaRf6qiQDERPUGvdTLH6B9N4kIUEw_3-6qQs8ooJCxC5N49qfYugT3tZRQBJsks3bTGDlQeqdhxWBe7mG1NyKIZPMRr0AsE2-url43x_rDAiVvxPDBL6ZJcJYi5HWQ1SqHLqyImcsX-w56YvoF0cniALpBnIUYpX87kPnTyL6a7Qh6I5mwdrThe area around Wilson in downtown Lima is known as the graphic and computer area, but I got a recommendation and tried out Cubo Graphic. 1,000 business cards, double sided, color, for 105 Soles ($32) delivery in Lima included. They would have designed them for me for an extra 20 soles. The cards took two days to order, print, and deliver. The quality of the printing was fine (as the sheen in the photo is because I took the photo of the open face sandwich through the glass counter).

These cards should keep me going until I go adventuring downtown. Who knows what kind of swag I can get printed down there?

 

48 Hours of Eating in Mexico City

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La Condesa Azul

eLBYNZfcfMa_GCskfM-t1JdQx1mElD3_juoOEi3WUiY-o2yuU_Nt2TgBh3_Wyy8v_ftyojCv3wC0pMR6u9_5Bh4dbb7Da37QlDblq6x3DDfuEYcYugZqXU3lcfFt--vP94mGK7n3lF6oGGbiyZqMJMlAcca946GKnxdnWINO6cZy29t1eXnNe4m1PdFreshly made warm tortilla in a the hand is the usual accompaniment to any meal in Mexico City.

bBkWPG78605pcrfizaBsii5yZ2MY736HOMVeGqtGjHHrnH4Eq52MF5DCJvPOtNeEyx1-4e-LLBnMx3c1og3RJGRRkMusGo-1d-U7Kx8CI6vfkYvChbDcoTKTXOsWzve7-fo7mNJXNBuhP4WLn3X9TccOYNEpOBu1fmzMIqI_18Gpev6Py-aJJC1yJfI went to Mexico City, or the federal district of Mexico, to eat. I forgot that one has to do something with the hours in between. Well, actually, I forgot that a few million other people would want to visit Frida, along with the few hundreds we saw outside the museum. We failed to see the inside of Frida’s blue house. So if that is your intent, plan ahead. Or take your chances and wait a few hours in the hopes that you will get in. It gives you something to do between meals.

gcTYCcGBeGQkHecWt-xQytah5oSvxoR6_5UfVxbjU3tqCOvihPtX-eLeR7Yn2CYesz5OYn83IxP0ofC0lRkTnc_pCiQDjicmIA6mDMUd7gGQB7mB2uGB_SSoxrfivuiHZqegerx5Fz_eoR-ZLOvB6_LUiHHfrHW-ViTJoOkKvV8T7rf8tr_DcNYs-JOn to the food. We started on a Friday evening at El Progreso. Chopped everything short of the oink at one end and beef fillet at the other end.

Sgf3mpObD0fc9fRgx9Owqfcm2omE7Y5aLG0x479aXesY2ipee2IzmUf72EnDtnemytzvTg1_9bS4xmyKz0qC8WKUAKoGgjWeqXTIhp7xzfPiHKj3kLnDQKFLltca_5ucCY9oDi6cvcVix1Sh6VodxsfPAPtxYaF0xUGKsDYQAA5CtPOVxZSsaPypSVThe crew are friendly and happy to explain things to a tourist but also equally at ease serving up tacos by the doubles to the cops and security guards who are clearly regulars.

t2FCOFNZbB9IFMrol3ld2fqhNiEaNZULZ3i3lMr8p1uc85YVp7CdrqikPdXaDnyMaE0dP_GTqD0bQTM0MJLiSjqqUl7flxSlc2eBXIkt1ebdV3gXWXR_YwmXBUqeylZdAbOGmdLrDYGBv3suWzytU-_ZgDMCFfKLq7a1JPGbZa4X3JpF0cs3Y7w24LGo after dark. The nightlights and shadows add a drama to this taqueria that would be lost in the harsh light of day.

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Toppings! Including mashed potato with chilies for your taco.

Then head to El Moro for a fried churro, but really, go for the ice cream. It’s served as one of the famous churro ice cream sandwiches, but I just scooped it out — it was sprinkled with speckles of vanilla dots.

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Everything but the oink at El Progreso.

Have their hot chocolate too. It’s a tradition. But, I was liked the ice cream. Call me a heathen!

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Ant egg omelet. The little white and brown things are the ant eggs.
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Sanborn’s grand hall.
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This Sanborn’s waitress had the most forlorn passive aggressive upsales technique. It was amusing. You almost wanted to fall for it.

For lunch, head downtown and eat at the Sanborns de los Azulejos. The building is made up of blue tile and hard to miss. If you eat in the salon on the Cinco de Mayo side, it’s got a soda fountain feel and very local. If you eat in the grand salon on the Francisco Madero, you will have a long wait but the pay off is eating in a GRAND HALL.

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From Lardo: Banana split. So yummy.
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The drink  guy at Lardos.

For dinner, try Lardo, for a feeling of being in Spain. Don’t get the deep fried green beans and you’ll be okay. Good cocktails and people watching.

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6ypWL5DGXZojHul9UwYJe7PgCU1fcWDLOlLZo3EplFAYeKrCZ_n9sZ2kFwgo2IG2Hf1_H-zXkSaFyLUGKLLt_GnWOiACTHhJN5kaNkBCFZYDWyYNGx6GFN4DGCzBlOH1LiqJwzC93Tgui_l_XC028QIahG9w8JJDGmuMo9MO-8AfEInxElc4_ZmDllFor lunch, go to Condesa Azul. It’s super upscale. Eat upstairs and you’ll feel like you’re eating in a glitzy tree house.

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The hot chocolate cart at Azul Condesa.

The Oaxacan ladies making tortillas are still the most beautiful part of an already pretty restaurant.

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I love a simple dessert. Soft merengue cream (some fruit flavor) and red berry sauce.

Along the way, eat corn on  the cob, spiced chips with lime, and sliced fruit with chili! If you need more, try the tacos in a basket (mainly to see what the hullabaloo is about), and if you must, go to Maison Kaiser for a French pastry.

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And I finally got to see some mariachi!

Frame Shop In Lima

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So Good, I’ll Publish it Thrice

Three years ago, when I first ate in Lima, I did not foresee that I’d ever be able to call Lima home. But, after the first 48 hours of constant eating, and the subsequent many visits, eating modern classics (ceviche classico) and trying less famous dishes (pejerrey roe sandwich), my cultural advisor (and friend), said to me one day, “you’ll just have to move here so we can try more dishes.” So I did.

My original posting was written in 2014 but, three years later, I still include the same places in the food tour. I include a photo from El Pan de la Chola, as I did not include that in my original posting, but it is part of my current food tour of Lima for my visitors.

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Enjoy!