Women Owned Restaurants in Lima

I often get asked about restaurants owned by women. Many restaurants have women pastry chefs and many bakeries are owned by women. For example, Tanta is owned by Astrid of Astrid y Gaston. Astrid is a pastry chef. But now Tanta now serves much more than pastry.
Here are some other places that I’ve found that are owned by women. (see addresses for most on my list of 100 places to eat in Lima)
Kjolle: owned by Pia Leon of Central. Open on Mondays.
Matria: the owner also comes out to the dining room to greet people.
La Grimanesa: an anticucho-maker made famous by Gaston Acurio at Mistura.
SeƱor de Sulcro: one of the institutions.
Las Tres Suecas: three Swedish women own this cafe.
Las Vecinas: Zonia, a Fulbright photographer and Peruvian American owns this place in Barranco.
Kilo: one of the few Asian women in the steakhouse business. She is rare. Apparently she also treats her staff well.
KG: a friend of Kilo’s owner. But the place is not very good.
La Red: Isolina started this place and since then her son has opened La Isolina and Las Reyes in her honor.
La Vaca Negra: a hole in the wall in Barranco where the first generation Chinese Peruvian owner ages her steaks and hamburger meat. Also serves ribs and chicken.
Quinoa Cafe: healthy cafe owned by women.
La Bodega de Trattoria Membrino: one of the classic places started by a woman who turned her dinner party hostessing skills into a business.
Aji555: owned by a Thai woman.
And a few other mentions:
Dhaasu: Also co-owned by a woman.
Rolly & Co: co-owned by a woman
El Cacaotal, the chocolate library shop: owned by a woman.

Danish Pastry

IMG_3797.JPGIn Danish, a danish is a “viennese bread” because it was brought to Denmark in the 19th century by immigrants from Vienna. There are many names and many types of pastry sold in Denmark and the bakeries, although no longer on every corner, are still to be had (today, 7-11 bakes fresh every few hours).

My favorites are actually not the well-known pretzel shaped “kringle” or the “duck breast” or “snail” but, one that is hard to find and the other that is more common. My favorite one is so popular that it’s sold at the airport. It’s called a “tebirkes” or “tea poppy seed” and it’s a rectangular shape with a covering of poppy seeds. Inside, the bottom layers are held down by a thin layer of almond paste mixed with sugar. The tebirkes isn’t overly sweet and I like to splice it open, slather it with Lurpack butter and a slice of smelly strong cheese. The second pastry that I always get, if I can, is called a “rosenbroed” or “rose bread”and it’s made from the basic kringle puff pastry but in a long plank shape. It’s covered with a thick layer of icing and sliced into long strips. Pure sugar, butter, and puff pastry!

Denmark is known for its Danish and in the U.S., there are a few places that claim to do the original kringle or Danish. But, Danish pastry is like New York pizza… it’s something in the water… if you can, go to the source.