In the Eye of the iPhone?

img_0073As much as I like the photos that I take with my “big” DSLR camera, I’ve stopped lugging it around. Sometimes convenience is more important than a big lens. With the improved camera on the iPhone, I tend to just snap my food photos before I eat, and avoid a fancy photo shoot. I imported a photo from my iPhone SE and did a little post-production on it. Yup, I think it looks fine for my purposes. That said, I still work on having the light (muted daylight is best) coming from one angle, and I only take close-up photos.

Usually every photo can look amazing on a computer screen — it all depends on the number of pixels on the screen. But, to print a photo, it has to be a certain size. These new iPhone SE photos are large so I think they will print without too much pixelation. I’ll find out later when I work on a new book…

Zooming In – I Love It!

Zooming in at maximum capacity.
Zooming in to capture color intensity.
The parrot with a standard lens.
The parrot with a standard lens.

I got a new lens. For the geeks, it’s a 75-300mm. All I know is that it allows me to zoom in from across the plaza. Right in tight on people’s faces. Or bird faces.

Close up portrait.
Close up portrait.

These photos were taken in Peru, in Iquitos, on the Amazon. All the subjects agreed to be photographed (the humans put on their tribal wear during the day to participate in the educational tours given to tourists).

A boy getting ready for the show.
A boy getting ready for the show.

People have fascinating faces and this zoom provides another tool for portraiture.The real personality shows up when the camera isn’t right in their faces.

A beautiful woman of the Amazon.
A beautiful woman of the Amazon.

As I kept saying when taking these photos: “me encanta” or “I love it.”

Rickshaw in Monsoon Photo

In the long hot rasping breath before the monsoon, my mind turns once more to images of Bangladesh. Decades ago, the only impression I had of Bangladesh was monsoon rain and flooding. Now, I have met the man who took the rickshaw photo of my imaginings.

The photographer, Zahid "Badol", with his photo of boys playing in the mud.
The photographer, Zahid “Badol”, with his photo of boys playing in the mud.

Obviously, to my vivacious and educated Bangladeshi friends, this image is so passe. “Why must you foreigners have only such images in your heads?” To which I reply, “This is not a bad image.” I see the rickshaw puller in the monsoon flood and find it an image of tenacity and perseverance. Not a bad thing to be known for, wherever you are.

A rickshaw puller in the monsoon.
A rickshaw puller in the monsoon.